Researchers invent ‘smart’ thread that collects diagnostic data when sutured into tissue

Threads penetrate multiple layers of tissue to sample interstitial fluid and direct it to sensing threads that collect data, such as pH and glucose levels. Conductive threads then deliver the data to a flexible wireless transmitter sitting on top of the skin. The inset figure, upper left, shows liquid flowing in threads sutured into skin. CREDIT Nano Lab, Tufts University
Threads penetrate multiple layers of tissue to sample interstitial fluid and direct it to sensing threads that collect data, such as pH and glucose levels. Conductive threads then deliver the data to a flexible wireless transmitter sitting on top of the skin. The inset figure, upper left, shows liquid flowing in threads sutured into skin.
CREDIT
Nano Lab, Tufts University
Advances could pave way for new generation of implantable and wearable diagnostics

For the first time, researchers led by Tufts University engineers have integrated nano-scale sensors, electronics and microfluidics into threads – ranging from simple cotton to sophisticated synthetics – that can be sutured through multiple layers of tissue to gather diagnostic data wirelessly in real time, according to a paper published online July 18 in Microsystems & Nanoengineering. The research suggests that the thread-based diagnostic platform could be an effective substrate for a new generation of implantable diagnostic devices and smart wearable systems.

The researchers used a variety of conductive threads that were dipped in physical and chemical sensing compounds and connected to wireless electronic circuitry to create a flexible platform that they sutured into tissue in rats as well as in vitro. The threads collected data on tissue health (e.g. pressure, stress, strain and temperature), pH and glucose levels that can be used to determine such things as how a wound is healing, whether infection is emerging, or whether the body’s chemistry is out of balance. The results were transmitted wirelessly to a cell phone and computer.

The three-dimensional platform is able to conform to complex structures such as organs, wounds or orthopedic implants.

While more study is needed in a number of areas, including investigation of long-term biocompatibility, researchers said initial results raise the possibility of optimizing patient-specific treatments.

“The ability to suture a thread-based diagnostic device intimately in a tissue or organ environment in three dimensions adds a unique feature that is not available with other flexible diagnostic platforms,” said Sameer Sonkusale, Ph.D., corresponding author on the paper and director of the interdisciplinary Nano Lab in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at SSSS School of Engineering. “We think thread-based devices could potentially be used as smart sutures for surgical implants, smart bandages to monitor wound healing, or integrated with textile or fabric as personalized health monitors and point-of-care diagnostics.”

Until now, the structure of substrates for implantable devices has essentially been two-dimensional, limiting their usefulness to flat tissue such as skin, according to the paper. Additionally, the materials in those substrates are expensive and require specialized processing.

“By contrast, thread is abundant, inexpensive, thin and flexible, and can be easily manipulated into complex shapes,” said Pooria Mostafalu, Ph.D., first author on the paper who was a doctoral student at Tufts when he worked on the project and is now a postdoctoral research fellow with the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University. “Additionally, analytes can be delivered directly to tissue by using thread’s natural wicking properties.”

Learn more: Researchers invent ‘smart’ thread that collects diagnostic data when sutured into tissue 

 

 

See Also
Two computer-generated configurations for routing a droplet through multiple lab-on-a-chip diagnostic tests, many more than are currently possible using manual methods. The software was developed by Michigan Tech's Shiyan Hu and Chen Liao. The figure is reproduced with permission of IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience. Credit: Chen Liao and Shiyan Hu

The Latest on: Implantable and wearable diagnostics

[google_news title=”” keyword=”implantable and wearable diagnostics” num_posts=”10″ blurb_length=”0″ show_thumb=”left”]

via Google News

 

The Latest on: Implantable and wearable diagnostics
  • What Is Biomedical Engineering?
    on May 23, 2024 at 5:01 pm

    This is evident throughout healthcare, from diagnosis and analysis to treatment and recovery, and has entered the public conscience though the proliferation of implantable medical ... and developing ...

  • Implantable Medical Devices Market Size to Worth USD 207 Bn by 2033
    on May 22, 2024 at 8:10 am

    The implantable medical devices market is driven by increasing chronic disorders, consumer awareness, and advanced technologies ...

  • The top stories out of Heart Rhythm Society 2024
    on May 20, 2024 at 6:45 am

    Once again, the top players in cardiac care gathered en masse as Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) 2024 took place in Boston last week.

  • Implantable and biocompatible battery powered by the body’s own oxygen
    on May 12, 2024 at 5:00 pm

    Researchers in China have developed an implantable Na–O 2 battery with an open cathode structure that runs on oxygen circulating in the body, potentially removing the limit on battery life. In tests ...

  • It May be Possible to Power Implantable Generators with Our Bodies
    on May 3, 2024 at 12:09 am

    “Future breakthroughs in thermoelectric materials, such as biocompatible options with improved efficiency, or advances in packaging technology could significantly boost the performance of implantable ...

  • Current and Emerging Indications for Implantable Cardiac Monitors
    on April 28, 2024 at 5:00 pm

    Several companies started designing implantable diagnostic devices for syncope and general cardiac arrhythmia monitoring, [9–12] demonstrating a growing interest about this application not only ...

  • Implantable Battery Charges Itself
    on April 24, 2024 at 6:37 pm

    At smaller levels there have been some more outside-of-the-box developments for things like embedded systems and, at least in the case of this battery that can recharge itself, implantable ...

  • Smallest Implantable Brain Stimulator Developed for Human Patients
    on April 14, 2024 at 5:00 pm

    Rice University engineers have developed the smallest implantable brain stimulator demonstrated in ... “Back home, the patient would put on their hat or wearable to power and communicate with the ...

  • Diagnostic Technologies for Early Cancer Detection
    on April 1, 2022 at 3:25 pm

    We are building implantable sensor technologies to facilitate the real-time monitoring, to enable the detection of cancer biomarkers at the earliest possible timepoints. Some of these sensors can even ...

  • BME 353: Bioelectronics
    on January 18, 2019 at 2:25 am

    Materials design and fabrication of passive and active components for sensitive, multimodal, and robust wearable and implantable devices ... multimodal wearable patches and implanted probes for ...

via  Bing News

 

What's Your Reaction?
Don't Like it!
0
I Like it!
0
Scroll To Top