UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science

The UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science (HSSEAS), informally known as UCLA Engineering, is the school of engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)

A technology that could significantly increase the speed and volume of disease testing while reducing the costs and usage of scarce supplies

Hydrogen fuel cell advance uses almost 40% less platinum per vehicle

Bionic Super 3D Cameras

A truly amazing adaptive heat-managing composite material

Finally: A fix that makes perovskite solar cells commercially viable

Another electronics design revolution? Electromagnetic Wave Router with unlimited bandwidth

Device being developed by UCLA engineers could ease the traffic of cellphone signals Mobile phones and computers use electromagnetic waves to send and receive information — they’re what enable our devices to upload photos and download apps. But there is only a limited amount of bandwidth available on the electromagnetic spectrum. Engineers have envisioned that

Another electronics design revolution? Electromagnetic Wave Router with unlimited bandwidth

UCLA researchers create exceptionally strong and lightweight new metal

Magnesium infused with dense silicon carbide nanoparticles could be used for airplanes, cars, mobile electronics and more A team led by researchers from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science has created a super-strong yet light structural metal with extremely high specific strength and modulus, or stiffness-to-weight ratio. The new metal is composed

UCLA researchers create exceptionally strong and lightweight new metal

Lens-free microscope can detect cancer at the cellular level

UCLA researchers develop device that can do the work of pathology lab microscopes UCLA researchers have developed a lens-free microscope that can be used to detect the presence of cancer or other cell-level abnormalities with the same accuracy as larger and more expensive optical microscopes. The invention could lead to less expensive and more portable

Lens-free microscope can detect cancer at the cellular level

New data compression method reduces big-data bottleneck; outperforms, enhances JPEG

In creating an entirely new way to compress data, a team of researchers from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science has drawn inspiration from physics and the arts. The result is a new data compression method that outperforms existing techniques, such as JPEG for images, and that could eventually be adopted

New data compression method reduces big-data bottleneck; outperforms, enhances JPEG

UCLA engineers develop a stretchable, foldable transparent electronic display

The OLED can be repeatedly stretched, folded and twisted at room temperature while still remaining lit and retaining its original shape. Imagine an electronic display nearly as clear as a window, or a curtain that illuminates a room, or a smartphone screen that doubles in size, stretching like rubber. Now imagine all of these being

UCLA engineers develop a stretchable, foldable transparent electronic display

Fat chance: Scientists unexpectedly discover stress-resistant stem cells in adipose tissue

“These cells could prove a revolutionary treatment option for numerous diseases, including heart disease and stroke and for tissue damage and neural regeneration.” Researchers from the UCLA Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology have isolated a new population of primitive, stress-resistant human pluripotent stem cells that are easily derived from fat tissue and are able to differentiate into

Fat chance: Scientists unexpectedly discover stress-resistant stem cells in adipose tissue

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UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science Research
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UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science Discovery
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