A new much more effective way to administer a Tuberculosis vaccine

As part of the global push to prevent tuberculosis, Distinguished Professor JoAnne Flynn and a group of Pitt researchers have discovered that intravenously injecting the standard tuberculosis vaccine could boost its power. (Courtesy of JoAnne Flynn)

A new much more effective way to administer a Tuberculosis vaccine
  • Worldwide, more people die from tuberculosis (TB) than any other infectious disease
  • Despite the majority being vaccinated—the current vaccine just isn’t that reliable
  • A new study published in Nature found that simply changing the way the vaccine is administered could dramatically boost its protective power.
  • “When we compared the lungs of animals given the vaccine intravenously versus the standard route, we saw a 100,000-fold reduction in bacterial burden. Six of the animals had no tuberculosis bacteria in their bodies and nine out of 10 animals showed no inflammation in their lungs.”
  • The intravenous vaccine, on the other hand, offered nearly full protection. There was virtually no TB bacteria in the lungs of these animals, and only one monkey in this group developed lung inflammation
  • “We’re a long way from realizing the translational potential of this work,” Flynn said. “But eventually we do hope to test in humans.”

The Latest Updates from Bing News & Google News

Go deeper with Bing News on:
Tuberculosis vaccine
Go deeper with Google Headlines on:
Tuberculosis vaccine

[google_news title=”” keyword=”tuberculosis vaccine” num_posts=”5″ blurb_length=”0″ show_thumb=”left”]

Go deeper with Bing News on:
Tuberculosis
Go deeper with Google Headlines on:
Tuberculosis

[google_news title=”” keyword=”tuberculosis” num_posts=”5″ blurb_length=”0″ show_thumb=”left”]

What's Your Reaction?
Don't Like it!
0
I Like it!
0
Scroll To Top